Mainly letters made of 'pixels' or elements of various shapes, sizes, and materials, captured in the wild – meaning outside of computer screens.
Found and collected here by Nina Stössinger, type & pixel aficionada.

stewf:

Stigmatypie: 19th-Century Dot Matrix Printing

Tonight I found an odd bitmappy portrait of Gutenburg (top) in a fold-out spread of Harpel’s Typograph, a type specimen from 1870. “What is a stigmatypie?”, I wondered. Some cursory research reveals it was a pioneering, but seldom used, technique for producing halftone images with very small type. It was developed around 1867 by Carl Fasol of Vienna.

Stigmatypie is described in the American Encyclopaedia of Printing (1871):

image

Pictures made with tiny periods of metal type! Not only was this a Victorian precursor to dot matrix printing, but also (in a way) ASCII art.

Read more from John McVey and Peter Fasol (Dutch), who is the source of the other images above, from Carl Fasol’s Album der Buchdruckerkunst.

text-mode:

The Future Starts Now - a 20x30 meter ASCII by Rikki Kasso, 2010. Placed on the Mejiro Kindergarten in Tokyo. The ASCII art was based on a photograph, infused with numbers and phrases about learning in English and Japanese. Rikki:

As I thought more into it, it became clear that this text in digital form also known as a “font” was also a brand new language that children will grow up with as an automatic second written language. A “Neo-Neanderthal” age where symbols and icons are used to reform communication.

Sort of like was argued here. More here and here.

Het Leidsche kaashuis, tiled storefront lettering. Spotted in Leiden, NL by Armina Ghazaryan

Het Leidsche kaashuis, tiled storefront lettering. Spotted in Leiden, NL by Armina Ghazaryan

stitchedtodeath:

Fresh from England: 15 hanks of crewel wool for my next project.

Nice colorful circus lettering!

Striped brick “26” house number, Rotterdam / NL. Photo by Florian Hardwig (source)

Striped brick “26” house number, Rotterdam / NL. Photo by Florian Hardwig (source)

Grolsch bottle cap lettering on car, Den Haag / Nederland. Photo by Mark Frömberg

Grolsch bottle cap lettering on car, Den Haag / Nederland. Photo by Mark Frömberg

“Fragmented Memory”: Textiles made from a computer’s physical memory by Phillip Stearns. See also the process video here.

Source: Designboom

text-mode:

Assisi embroidery, based on an ancient Italian tradition where the background is filled with embroidery stitches and the main motifs are left void i.e. unstitched.